I met a young girl recently who was going through a really tough time at school. She does not fit in, feels like an outsider, is exceptionally creative, not very sporty, test averse, and told me she doesn’t like life very much because it is too hard and often sad. Self harm has crossed her mind.

I chatted with her for a long time and finally discovered that she has ADD and feels ashamed and embarrassed about it because she is teased at school and feels like she is not very smart due to the diagnosis.

I told her some dumb jokes, a few self deprecating stories and then shared a little secret I have with her. I also struggled with ADD at school and still often wrestle with the remnants today.

She was so happy to learn that I was like her. I told her that we belong to an amazing and exciting subset of people who rock the world, sometimes literally. I am thrilled to say that she was encouraged and inspired to turn her struggle into expression and is now painting up a storm and making little movies and, yes, doing a million projects at the same time like most ADD people do. She has found comfort in her discomfort though, and that warms my heart.

To help her(and anyone else) understand how my brain works, I made this little animated video about my experience with ADD.

Many people have some of the issues those with ADD experience but most don’t have them all tangled up together.

Other people with ADD include: Justin Timberlake, Emma Watson, Zooe Deschanel, Ryan Gosling, Lisa Ling, Adam Levine, Magic Johnson, Mozart, DaVinci, Richard Branson, and astronaut Scott Kelly, to name just a few.

(This short video is my personal experience and not a general statement on the subject:)

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‘The most important thing in communication is to hear what isn’t being said’ – Peter Drucker.

From my ‘Stories Without Words’ series. (Photographed at the Botshabelo Orphanage, Magaliesburg, South Africa)